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Joint degrees listed under /degrees/joint/

JD/MS, JD/PhD

Stanford joint degree programs really do help law students begin to "think like a client." The interdisciplinary background I'm building will help me be a better lawyer and a more effective advocate. – Brian Shillinglaw, JD/MS, Emmett Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources (E-IPER) '08

JD/MS

As the nexus of top schools and programs in law, engineering, and business—located in the heart of Silicon Valley—Stanford stands at the center of the revolution in both technology and information age. Legal policy, engineering breakthroughs, and world-changing entrepreneurship all play out here in real time, creating unique opportunities, and special responsibilities.

JD/MA

JD/MA, JD/PhD

At this point in my career, I'm doing exactly what I want to do, and I owe it to my Stanford joint degree. I had enormous flexibility to tailor the program to my academic and professional goals, making it easy to move between two academic homes and do the research I wanted to do. – Gillian Hadfield, JD/PhD in Law and Economics, '88

JD/MS

As the nexus of top schools and programs in law, computer science, engineering, and business—located in the heart of Silicon Valley—Stanford stands at the center of the revolution in both technology and information age. Legal policy, technological breakthroughs, and world-changing entrepreneurship all play out here in real time, creating unique opportunities, and special responsibilities.

JD/MBA

My classmates in both law and business schools have exceeded my highest expectations. At Stanford, you find people with a variety of backgrounds, but a common desire to learn from each other, even across disciplines. – Keia Cole, JD/MBA '09

JD/MS, JD/PhD

Not only does my joint degree program prepare me to build bridges between lawyers and scientists, it's also incredibly exciting. As a student, I've led a group in developing a novel medical device with the potential to significantly improve patient outcomes—something usually only medical students and scientists can do. – Noah Richmond, JD/MS in Law and Bioengineering, '08

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