open
Elsewhere Online twitter Facebook SLS Blogs YouTube SLS Channel Linked In SLSNavigator SLS on Flickr

International Deal Making

This course specifically focuses on the application of legal and business knowledge to real world transactions in the international context. This is a practical course for students who are interested in applying their knowledge to deal structuring, identifying and resolving legal and business concerns, negotiations, documentation and deal closing. The caselets (short-form cases), developed by the instructor (JD/MBA/CPA) from his 25 years' experience in deal-making in China and Asia, raising $9 billion in equity and debt, often place the student inside the negotiating room and challenge the student to strike deals with senior private and public officials. This course is structured as an intense large seminar with a maximum of 30 law and 10 business students, mixed into groups for class work and presentations.nnCourse objectives: (1) To give the law student a deeper understanding of the legal issues that arise in cross-border transactions, and a broader understanding of the business context in which legal advice is asked for and given; (2) to give the business student an appreciation of the importance of reading the legal documents which purport to describe his/her business transaction, and an understanding of the role the legal advisor can and should play in deal structuring, negotiating and documenting aspects; and (3) for both sets of students, there will be the opportunity to strategize, structure and be the principal negotiator in real world, substantive, international business deals. Following the outcomes decided in class, the actual outcomes and subsequent events will be shared. This is an applied business law course focused on structuring, negotiating and closing pioneering business transactions which have several legal and business obstacles to overcome.nnElements used in grading: Class participation (30%), attendance, final paper (30%) and group presentation (40%).


Instructors for this course (Past and Present)

Laurence Franklin