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CodeX Speaker Series with Daniel Katz: "Quantitative Legal Prediction – or – How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Start Preparing for the Data Driven Future of the Legal Services Industry”

Details

November 8, 2012 12:45pm - 2:00pm

Room 190

Do I have a case?  What is our likely exposure?  How much is this going to cost? Are these documents relevant?  What will happen if we leave this particular provision out of this contract? How can we best staff this particular legal matter?  For many years the answers to these questions have been the exclusive province of human assessment.  However, this is changing.  This is the era of “big data” and soft artificial intelligence. Increases in computing power, decreases in data storage costs - taken together with significant improvements in machine learning threaten to fundamentally alter the market for legal services.  Aided by growing access to large bodies of semi-structured legal information, the most disruptive of all possible displacing technologies - quantitative legal prediction - now stands on the horizon and it is likely to drive a substantial amount of the future innovation in the legal services industry.

CodeX: Stanford Center for Legal Informatics hosts a presentation by Professor Daniel Katz.  He was a Fellow in Empirical Legal Studies at the University of Michigan Law School and an NSF-IGERT Fellow at the University of Michigan Center for the Study of Complex Systems. His wide variety of academic interests include positive legal theory, quantitative modeling of litigation and jurisprudence, and the impact of information technology on the market for legal services.

Lunch will be served.

About the Speaker:

Prior to joining the MSU College of Law faculty, Professor Daniel Katz was a Fellow in Empirical Legal Studies at the University of Michigan Law School and an NSF-IGERT Fellow at the University of Michigan Center for the Study of Complex Systems. His wide variety of academic interests include positive legal theory, quantitative modeling of litigation and jurisprudence, and the impact of information technology on the market for legal services.

Professor Katz has published articles in scholarly journals such as Cornell Journal of Law and Public Policy, Virginia Tax Review, Ohio State Law Journal, Journal of Legal Education, Journal of Law and Politics, Physica A and the Proceedings of the International Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Law. His work also has been featured in print and online outlets including the New York Times, The Globe and Mail, Slate Magazine, Wired Magazine Blog, U.S. News & World Report Blog, Financial Times Blog, Huffington Post, National Law Journal, Law Technology News and Marginal Revolution. Professor Katz is also an avid blogger; his posts can be found at Computational Legal Studies.

Professor Katz received his Ph.D. in Political Science and Public Policy (with an focus on Complex Systems) from the University of Michigan in 2011. He graduated cum laude from the University of Michigan Law School in 2005, and simultaneously obtained a M.P.P. from the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy at the University of Michigan.