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The Changing Law Firm Model -- A Discussion with Professor William Henderson and Professor Marc Galanter

Details

November 15, 2012 12:45pm - 2:00pm

Room 180

Lunch will be served.

Sponsored by the Stanford Center on the Legal Profession.

The Center on the Legal Profession hosts an interactive discussion with William Henderson, Professor of Law and Director of Indiana Law School's Center on the Global Legal Profession, and Marc Galanter, the John and Rylla Bosshard Professor of Law and South Asian Studies at the University of Wisconsin - Madison and LSE Centennial Professor at the London School of Economics and Political Science. Henderson and Galanter will discuss how the law firm model continues to evolve as a result of technological advances, the economic crisis, and client demands, and how the new model may affect career paths, work-life balance, and diversity.

About the Speakers:

William D. Henderson

Professor of Law and Val Nolan Faculty Fellow; Director, Center of the Global Legal Profession

William D. Henderson joined the IU Maurer School of Law faculty in 2003 following a visiting appointment at Chicago-Kent College of Law and a judicial clerkship for Judge Richard Cudahy of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit.

In conjunction with other Indiana Law faculty, Henderson introduced a new first-year course in 2009 called The Legal Profession. This mandatory four-hour course covers the ethics, competencies, and economics of the legal profession. Inspired by the 2007 Carnegie Report on Legal Education, the course uses legal ethics and the law of lawyering as the spine of a course that immerses students in a variety of practice settings and that educates them on the competencies they must develop to succeed in their professional lives.

In addition, Henderson teaches various business law courses, including Corporations, Business Planning, Project Management, and The Law Firm as Business Organization. He is also director of Indiana Law's Center on the Global Legal Profession.

Henderson's scholarship focuses on empirical analysis of the legal profession and legal education. His published work includes articles in the North Carolina Law Review, Indiana Law Journal, Texas Law Review, Michigan Law Review, and Stanford Law Review. He is also a frequent commentator, author, and lecturer on trends in the legal profession, including patterns of lawyer mobility, the relationship between profitability and associate satisfaction, the economic geography of large law firms, and attrition rates of female and minority attorneys. His work appears frequently in such national publications as The American Lawyer, The Wall Street Journal, ABA Journal, and the National Law Journal.

In addition to his teaching responsibilities, Henderson is a research associate with the Law School Survey of Student Engagement (LSSSE) and a principal in Lawyer Metrics, a consulting firm that uses evidence-based methods to assist firms in identifying, selecting, and developing world-class lawyers. He is also a regular contributor to the Empirical Legal Studies Blog (www.elsblog.org) and is an editor of the Legal Whiteboard blog.

Marc Galanter

John and Rylla Bosshard Professor of Law and South Asian Studies at the University of Wisconsin - Madison and LSE Centennial Professor at the London School of Economics and Political Science

Marc Galanter, the John and Rylla Bosshard Professor of Law and South Asian Studies at the University of Wisconsin - Madison and LSE Centennial Professor at the London School of Economics and Political Science, studies litigation, lawyers, and legal culture. He is the author of a number of highly regarded and seminal studies of litigation and disputing in the United States (including “Why the ‘Haves’ Come Out Ahead: Speculations on the Limits of Legal Change,” one of the most-cited articles in the legal literature. His work includes pioneering studies on the impact of disputant capabilities in adjudication, the relation of public legal institutions to informal regulation, and patterns of litigation in the United States. He is also co-author of Tournament of Lawyers (with Thomas Palay, 1991) which is widely viewed as the most robust explanation of the growth and transformation of large law firms.

He is an outspoken critic of misrepresentations of the American civil justice system and of the inadequate knowledge base that makes the system so vulnerable to misguided attacks.

Much of his early work was on India. He is recognized as a leading American student of the Indian legal system. He is the author of Competing Equalities: Law and the Backward Classes in India (1984, 1991) and Law and Society in Modern India (1989, 1992). He is an Honorary Professor of the National Law School of India, served as advisor to the Ford Foundation on legal services and human rights programs in India, and was retained as an expert by the government of India in the litigation arising from the Bhopal disaster. He is currently engaged in research on access to justice in India.

A leading figure in the empirical study of the legal system, he has been editor of the Law & Society Review, President of the Law and Society Association, Chair of the International Commission on Folk Law and Legal Pluralism, a Guggenheim Fellow, and a Fellow of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. He is a member of the American Law Institute and a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He received degrees in philosophy and law from the University of Chicago. In addition to the University of Wisconsin and the London School of Economics, he has taught at Chicago, Buffalo, Columbia, and Stanford.