Events

open
Elsewhere Online twitter Facebook SLS Blogs YouTube SLS Channel Linked In SLSNavigator SLS on Flickr

Disability Legal Studies: Critical & Practical Perspectives

Details

February 6, 2014 5:00pm - 7:00pm

Room 280B

Brought to you by the Stanford Program in Law and Society

Co-sponsored by John and Terry Levin Center for Public Service and Public Interest Law & Stanford Critical Law Society 

In recent decades, people with disabilities and their allies around the world have started to challenge conventions about the phenomenon of disability. A corner stone for this movement is the “Social Model of Disability” which views it as a social, rather than purely medical, phenomenon. This evolving model focuses on society’s attitudes and stereotypes towards people with disabilities as a reason for discrimination and exclusion. Apart from inspiring a fairly new academic field known as “Disability Studies” that examines disability as a social, cultural, and political phenomenon, ideas derived from the Social Model also transcend multiple disciplines including legal studies and practice.

This panel is designed to introduce only a few of the numerous ways disability and law intersect in the new field known as “Disability Legal Studies.” Featuring both practitioners and researchers, this panel will explore how issues in criminal law, family law, impact litigation and technology affect the lives and rights of people with disabilities and overlap with contemporary concepts of the disability phenomenon.

 

Panelists

"When Justice Sleeps: Violence and Abuse Against Persons with Developmental Disabilities" – Prof. Joan Petersilia, Stanford Law School
 
”ADA and Technology: Bridging the Digital Divide Through Impact Litigation” – Larry Paradis, Esq., Disability Rights Advocates
 
“Parenting while Disabled: Legislative Profiling of Parents with Disabilities in America” – Ella Callow, Esq., Through the Looking Glass – National Center for Parents with Disabilities and their Families
 
Comments and Narrative - Dr. Susan Schweik, UC Berkeley & Doron Dorfman, Stanford Law School