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Affordable Care Act Moot Court Energizes Packed House

Publication Date: 
March 18, 2012
Source: 
News Blaze

Professor Kathleen M. Sullivan and professor Daniel P. Kessler were both mentioned in the following article discussing the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act. News Blaze reported the story:

Video Offers 'Peek Behind The Curtain' of Highly Anticipated U.S. Supreme Court Case Set to Begin Oral Arguments on March 26.

This week, The California Endowment hosted a nonpartisan moot court event at which the constitutionality of the minimum coverage requirement in the the new federal health care law, the Affordable Care Act (ACA), was argued by renowned Supreme Court litigator Kathleen M. Sullivan before a panel of nine blue ribbon constitutional and health policy experts.

Sullivan, Former Dean of Stanford Law and partner at Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan, filed an [4]amicus brief with the Supreme Court in the case (United States Department of Health & Human Services v. Florida et al.) on behalf of The California Endowment.

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This week, The California Endowment hosted a nonpartisan moot court event at which the constitutionality of the minimum coverage requirement in the the new federal health care law, the Affordable Care Act (ACA), was argued by renowned Supreme Court litigator Kathleen M. Sullivan before a panel of nine blue ribbon constitutional and health policy experts.

Sullivan, Former Dean of Stanford Law and partner at Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan, filed an [4]amicus brief with the Supreme Court in the case (United States Department of Health & Human Services v. Florida et al.) on behalf of The California Endowment.

In her opening remarks she gave a rousing defense of the new health care law's "controversial" minimum coverage requirement. "Only if you ensure that people take health insurance before they get sick, before they are on their way to the hospital in the ambulance ... unless you have that mandatory minimum coverage, the other two provisions won't work," said Sullivan.

...

In a memorable response to a pointed line of questioning from Justice Daniel Kessler, Sullivan directly attacked the notion that the broken health care system in America could somehow be fixed without the individual mandate in the minimum coverage requirement. She leveled the playing field and caused an audience cheer by saying, "We've tried it your way â€" [now] let me refer to The California Endowment's amicus brief!"