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Google's Moon Shot

Publication Date: 
January 29, 2007
Source: 
The New Yorker
Author: 
Jeffrey Toobin

Google as well as other publishers are on their way to create a vast online library. Several of the conventional publishing houses have filed lawsuits against Google seeking to stop the project. The legal wrangling causes Professor Lawrence Lessig to comment on some of the ramifications of a settlement:

But a settlement that serves the parties' interests does not necessarily benefit the public. "It’s clearly in both sides’ interest to settle," Lawrence Lessig, a professor at Stanford Law School, said. "Businesses in Internet time can't wait around for years for lawsuits to be resolved. Google wants to be able to get this done, and get permission to resume scanning copyrighted material at all the libraries. For the publishers, if Google gives them anything at all, it creates a practical precedent, if not a legal precedent, that no one has the right to scan this material without their consent. That's a win for them. The problem is that even though a settlement would be good for Google and good for the publishers, it would be bad for everyone else."

...

Google’s advantage may well be cemented if the company settles its lawsuits with the publishers and authors. "If Google says to the publishers, ‘We'll pay,' that means that everyone else who wants to get into this business will have to say, 'We’ll pay,' " Lessig said. "The publishers will get more than the law entitles them to, because Google needs to get this case behind it. And the settlement will create a huge barrier for any new entrants in this field."