News Center

open
Elsewhere Online twitter Facebook SLS Blogs YouTube SLS Channel Linked In SLSNavigator SLS on Flickr

Shaping The Future: Top 100

Publication Date: 
September 17, 2008
Source: 
Daily Journal Supplement

The Daily Journal named Lecturer in Law and Director of the Fair Use Project Anthony Falzone and Professor Mark A. Lemley as among the Top 100 California lawyers:

Anthony Falzone

As executive director of the Fair Use Project at Stanford Law School's Center for Internet and Society, Falzone finds himself in the middle of hot-button copyright disputes. In June, he won a free speech battle against the family of John Lennon over the right to use a clip of his song "Imagine" in a film casting doubt on the theory of evolution. Earlier in the year, he was on a legal team that argued unsuccessfully against lawyers for J.K. Rowling, who persuaded a New York judge to issue an injunction barring publication of a reference guide to the Harry Potter series.

Mark Lemley

As a Stanford Law School professor, Lemley is not content to opine from the sidelines. Instead, he's busy working on intellectual property cases as of counsel with Keker & Van Nest - even as he writes provocative research papers and is gearing up to launch a litigation clearinghouse that will monitor every patent case filed in the United States. On the litigation front, he is representing two female Yale Law School students allegedly threatened by anonymous individuals who posted derogatory online comments about them. He also has written amicus briefs on topics ranging from U.S. Patent Office rules to California employment law.

Mark Lemley Stanford Law School Stanford As a Stanford Law School professor, Lemley is not content to opine from the sidelines. Instead, he's busy working on intellectual property cases as of counsel with Keker & Van Nest - even as he writes provocative research papers and is gearing up to launch a litigation clearinghouse that will monitor every patent case filed in the United States. On the litigation front, he is representing two female Yale Law School students allegedly threatened by anonymous individuals who posted derogatory online comments about them. He also has written amicus briefs on topics ranging from U.S. Patent Office rules to California employment law.