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Faculty Spotlight


Technical, legal, and economic choices will affect whether the Internet can realize its full potential. To me, understanding what the impact of the various choices will be and what role the law should play in all this is one of the most exciting areas of research in this field today.


Barbara van Schewick
Professor of Law and Helen L. Crocker Faculty Scholar, Center for Internet and Society

Barbara van Schewick̕s research focuses on the economic, regulatory, and strategic implications of communication networks. Her explorations of how changes in the architecture of computer networks affect the economic environment for innovation and competition on the Internet, and how the law should react to these changes, have made her a leading expert on the issue of network neutrality. Professor van Schewick directs Stanford Law School’s Center for Internet and Society and is an associate professor (by courtesy) of electrical engineering at Stanford’s Department of Electrical Engineering. Prior to joining the Stanford Law faculty, van Schewick was a senior researcher at the Technical University Berlin, Germany, and a nonresidential fellow of the Center for Internet and Society. She has advised the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research on innovation and technology policy and worked with the German Federal Network Agency on spectrum policy.


I think within the next 10 to 20 years we’re going to be able to predict a significant number of serious neurological and mental diseases. If a brain abnormality makes some people powerfully predisposed to violence, how responsible should we hold them for their actions?

IN “PILL POWER,” DISCOVER PRESENTS THE BRAIN, A DISCUSSION WITH AMY BARTH OF DISCOVER MAGAZINE, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009


Hank Greely
Deane F. and Kate Edelman Johnson Professor of Law, Stanford Program in Law, Science & Technology
Deane F. and Kate Edelman Johnson Professor of Law, Center for Law and the Biosciences

Director of the Center for Law and the Biosciences, chair of the steering committee of the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics, and director of its Program in Neuroethics, Professor Hank Greely has developed an interdisciplinary specialty in health law with a focus on the intersection of law, ethics, and the biosciences. He is widely interviewed and cited for his views on issues related to law, bioscience, and medicine, and has written on a wide range of topics, including protection of people who take part in genetic research, genetic discrimination, genetic testing, neuroscientific lie detection, and human cloning. Actively involved in the formulation of bioscience policy, Professor Greely chairs the California Advisory Committee on Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research and is a co-director of the MacArthur Foundation’s Law and Neuroscience Project.


The computer world has changed a lot since 1981. The courts have the power to adapt the law and keep it up with changing technologies, and they had been doing that. But Bilski is a step backward.

REGARDING THE BILSKI DECISION ON BUSINESS METHODS PATENTS, LOS ANGELES TIMES, FEBRUARY 24, 2009


Mark A. Lemley
William H. Neukom Professor of Law, Center for Law and the Biosciences, CodeX: The Stanford Center for Legal Informatics, Stanford Program in Law, Science & Technology, John M. Olin Program in Law and Economics

Director of the Stanford Program in Law, Science & Technology as well as the LLM Program in Law, Science & Technology and Co-Director, Transatlantic Technology Law Forum, Professor Lemley is widely considered to be among the top intellectual property scholars in the United States. He has written six books and more than 100 articles on intellectual property, antitrust, and Internet law, including the two-volume treatise IP and Antitrust. He has taught intellectual property law to federal and state judges at numerous Federal Judicial Center and ABA programs, and has testified before Congress and the Federal Trade Commission on patent, antitrust, and constitutional law matters. He served as counsel at Fish & Richardson and Brown & Bain.


China views itself as bound by the international norms of copyright and is becoming a significant player on that stage as a copyright owner itself. … (Copyright violations) happen everywhere. It is not surprising that it’s been taken down, nor will it be surprising if it pops up somewhere else in China on some other website. It’s hard to control.

ON THE REMOVAL OF A TRANSLATION OF DAN BROWN’S BESTSELLER THE LOST SYMBOL FROM A CHINESE WEBSITE DUE TO COPYRIGHT COMPLAINTS, CHINA DAILY, DECEMBER 1, 2009


Paul Goldstein
Stella W. and Ira S. Lillick Professor of Law, John M. Olin Program in Law and Economics

A globally recognized expert on intellectual property law, Professor Goldstein is the author of influential treatises on U.S. and international copyright law, plus leading casebooks. He also wrote the widely acclaimed Copyright’s Highway: From Gutenberg to the Celestial Jukebox, on the history and future of copyright, and Errors and Omissions and A Patent Lie, the first two in a series of novels devoted to intellectual property themes. Goldstein served as chair of the U.S. Office of Technology Assessment Advisory Panel on Intellectual Property Rights in an Age of Electronics and Information, was a visiting scholar at the Max Planck Institute for Foreign and International Patent, Copyright, and Competition Law in Munich, Germany, and teaches on the masters faculty of the Munich Intellectual Property Law Center. He serves as of counsel in Morrison & Foerster’s intellectual property group.