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Mediation

Given that over 90% of cases settle before trial and a large percentage of these are settled in mediation, it has become quite important for lawyers to learn to participate effectively in this process. Many lawyers also study mediation because it improves their conflict management skills and may provide them with a foundation to work as mediators in the long term. In this process, the mediator facilitates the parties' negotiation in an effort to find a mutually acceptable resolution to the conflict, often with a lawyer's advice and assistance. Mediation may take place at any stage in a dispute, in some cases preventing litigation altogether, and in others attempting to abbreviate litigation or settle a case on appeal. This course will introduce you to the theory and practice of mediation from both the mediator and the advocate's perspective, through a combination of roleplay and skills exercises, readings, discussions, demonstrations, and videotaping. You will mediate disputes based on actual cases, and be coached during several roleplays by professional Bay Area mediators. The course goals are to understand the nature of conflict and principles of conflict management, to develop the communication skills essential to effective mediation, to evaluate various mediation models and mediator styles, to consider the policy and ethical implications of the expanding use of mediation, and to develop the skills necessary to represent clients in mediation. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and e-mail the Consent Application Form available on the SLS Registrar's Office website (see Registration and Selection of Classes for Stanford Law Students) to the instructors. See Consent Application Form for submission deadline. Prerequisite: Negotiation (LAW 615). Mandatory attendance at first class and attendance as required by the instructor. ONE SATURDAY CLASS (counts as two classes). Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance, assignments.

2015-2016 Spring
03/28/2016 - 05/27/2016 Tue 6:30 PM - 9:30 PM
Instructors: Jessica Notini

Instructors for this course (Past and Present)

Jessica Notini