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Educators Sue State Over School Funds

Publication Date: 
May 21, 2010
Source: 
Daily Journal
Author: 
Dhyana Levey

The Youth and Education Law Project (YELP) of the Mills Legal Clinic at Stanford Law School is co-counsel with Bingham McCutchen in Robles-Wong v. California representing individual plaintiffs, including the named plaintiff Maya Robles-Wong. Under the direction of Professor Bill Koski, the Youth and Education Law Project provides Stanford Law students the opportunity to represent youth and families in special education and school discipline matters, community outreach and education, school reform litigation, policy research, and legal advocacy. This lawsuit asks the court to compel the State of California to align its school finance system—its funding policies and mechanisms—with the educational program that the State has put in place.

Dhyana Levey of The Daily Journal filed this story on the lawsuit:

California's school finance system unconstitutionally deprives students of an adequate education and must therefore be reformed, a lawsuit filed Thursday on behalf of a broad coalition of students and educators claimed.

"We can no longer be surprised that academic achievement for all subgroups of California students is near the bottom in the nation," said Carlos Garcia, superintendent of the San Francisco Unified School District, which is a plaintiff in the lawsuit. "Here in San Francisco, our teachers, principals and other educators are working as hard as they can to deliver our students a high-quality education, but the state's insufficient finance system prevents us from getting the job done."

...

The plaintiffs have a different view. "The education system has been broken for quite some time," said William S. Koski, director of Stanford Law School's Youth and Education Law Project and an attorney representing the individual plaintiffs. "It was just a matter of time before we realized the politics in Sacramento aren't going to fix this."