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Foreign Study Program Overview and Goals

Study Abroad Opportunities

Stanford offers two different options for students who wish to study at a foreign law school.

a. Schools with which Stanford Law School has an established foreign study arrangement

Stanford has concluded exchange agreements with the following leading foreign law schools. Under these arrangements, each school will receive a limited number of Stanford students each year as exchange students.

  • Bucerius Law School (BLS) – Hamburg, Germany
    • Courses taught in English
    • Autumn term only
  • Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) Jerusalem, Israel
  • Institut d'√Čtudes Politiques de Paris (Sciences Po) – Paris, France
    • Courses offered in both French and English, and exchange students may choose the language of instruction.
  • National University of Singapore (NUS) Singapore
    • Courses taught in English
  • Peking University Law School (PKU) – Beijing, China
    • Most courses taught in Chinese (Mandarin), but with a select number of courses offered in English.
    • Spring term only
  •  Waseda University Law School (WLS) Tokyo, Japan
    • Courses taught in Japanese, but with a select number of courses offered in English.

Each of Stanford’s partner schools will accept only a limited number of Stanford students each year (one or two, depending on the school). Stanford students must thus both obtain approval from the Foreign Law Programs Committee and be accepted to the partner school they wish to attend.

b. Study at schools with which Stanford does not have a foreign study arrangement

Students may petition to study at a foreign law school with which Stanford does not have a foreign study arrangement if they can demonstrate that: (1) they have a compelling need or interest in attending the school in question; and (2) their program of study at the school warrants a semester of Stanford Law School credit. In this regard, the American Bar Association requires that:

The foreign institution will generally be one that is government sanctioned or recognized, if educational institutions are state regulated within the country; recognized or approved by an evaluation body, if such an agency exists within the country; or chartered to award first degrees in law by the appropriate authority within the country.

Beyond this, the school should have a demonstrated record of academic and institutional excellence. The school should employ academic standards comparable to those employed at Stanford Law School.

Students may not attend programs of U.S. law schools located abroad, and may not ordinarily attend programs at overseas law schools that are meant primarily for foreign students.